Apr 15, 2015

ASYMPTOTE RECEIVES THE INTERNATIONAL LITERARY TRANSLATION INITIATIVE AWARD AT 2015 LONDON BOOK FAIR


LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association.

The award is presented to the organisation that the committee considers to have “succeeded in raising the profile of literature in translation, promoting literary translators, and encouraging new translators and translated works,” whose scope of achievement lies outside of the UK. Last year’s winner was the Best Translated Book Award, launched by Three Percent, the University of Rochester’s ground-breaking prize for literature in translation.

Shortlisted alongside the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Paper Republic (China), Asymptote’s recognition this year reinforces its status as an innovative audio-visual platform showcasing the most exciting writing from around the world.

According to the selection committee, who came to a "unanimous decision," Asymptote is "the place where translators want to publish their own and their authors' work."

Asymptote’s Editor-in-Chief, Lee Yew Leong, said, "It is extremely special for our magazine to be honored among the many wonderful international initiatives celebrated at this year's London Book Fair Awards, especially given that our international setup means we don't qualify for national funding. This award truly belongs to all editors, contributors, and guest artists past and present, who have made Asymptote what it is today: a site to discover the best in world literature.”

This is the first time that a Singaporean organisation has been nominated for, as well as won, an award at the London Book Fair.

Asymptote is delighted to be officially recognized for its work in the field of literary translation over the past few years, and wishes to first and foremost thank all its supporters and collaborators from around the world who have made it possible for Asymptote to consistently publish such stunning work. Our team of volunteer editors, translators, designers, and other creatives is thrilled to be sharing this award, and we are already hard at work on our exciting next issue, out this coming July!



LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association. - See more at: http://www.asymptotejournal.com/lbf2015award.php#sthash.3QhDQqdt.dpuf
LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association.
The award is presented to the organisation that the committee considers to have “succeeded in raising the profile of literature in translation, promoting literary translators, and encouraging new translators and translated works,” whose scope of achievement lies outside of the UK. Last year’s winner was the Best Translated Book Award, launched by Three Percent, the University of Rochester’s ground-breaking prize for literature in translation.
Shortlisted alongside the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Paper Republic (China), Asymptote’s recognition this year reinforces its status as an innovative audio-visual platform showcasing the most exciting writing from around the world.
According to the selection committee, who came to a "unanimous decision," Asymptote is "the place where translators want to publish their own and their authors' work."
Asymptote’s Editor-in-Chief, Lee Yew Leong, said, "It is extremely special for our magazine to be honored among the many wonderful international initiatives celebrated at this year's London Book Fair Awards, especially given that our international setup means we don't qualify for national funding. This award truly belongs to all editors, contributors, and guest artists past and present, who have made Asymptote what it is today: a site to discover the best in world literature.”
This is the first time that a Singaporean organisation has been nominated for, as well as won, an award at the London Book Fair.
Asymptote is delighted to be officially recognized for its work in the field of literary translation over the past few years, and wishes to first and foremost thank all its supporters and collaborators from around the world who have made it possible for Asymptote to consistently publish such stunning work. Our team of volunteer editors, translators, designers, and other creatives is thrilled to be sharing this award, and we are already hard at work on our exciting next issue, out this coming July!
- See more at: http://www.asymptotejournal.com/lbf2015award.php#sthash.3QhDQqdt.dpuf
LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association.
The award is presented to the organisation that the committee considers to have “succeeded in raising the profile of literature in translation, promoting literary translators, and encouraging new translators and translated works,” whose scope of achievement lies outside of the UK. Last year’s winner was the Best Translated Book Award, launched by Three Percent, the University of Rochester’s ground-breaking prize for literature in translation.
Shortlisted alongside the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Paper Republic (China), Asymptote’s recognition this year reinforces its status as an innovative audio-visual platform showcasing the most exciting writing from around the world.
According to the selection committee, who came to a "unanimous decision," Asymptote is "the place where translators want to publish their own and their authors' work."
Asymptote’s Editor-in-Chief, Lee Yew Leong, said, "It is extremely special for our magazine to be honored among the many wonderful international initiatives celebrated at this year's London Book Fair Awards, especially given that our international setup means we don't qualify for national funding. This award truly belongs to all editors, contributors, and guest artists past and present, who have made Asymptote what it is today: a site to discover the best in world literature.”
This is the first time that a Singaporean organisation has been nominated for, as well as won, an award at the London Book Fair.
Asymptote is delighted to be officially recognized for its work in the field of literary translation over the past few years, and wishes to first and foremost thank all its supporters and collaborators from around the world who have made it possible for Asymptote to consistently publish such stunning work. Our team of volunteer editors, translators, designers, and other creatives is thrilled to be sharing this award, and we are already hard at work on our exciting next issue, out this coming July!
- See more at: http://www.asymptotejournal.com/lbf2015award.php#sthash.3QhDQqdt.dpuf
LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association.
The award is presented to the organisation that the committee considers to have “succeeded in raising the profile of literature in translation, promoting literary translators, and encouraging new translators and translated works,” whose scope of achievement lies outside of the UK. Last year’s winner was the Best Translated Book Award, launched by Three Percent, the University of Rochester’s ground-breaking prize for literature in translation.
Shortlisted alongside the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Paper Republic (China), Asymptote’s recognition this year reinforces its status as an innovative audio-visual platform showcasing the most exciting writing from around the world.
According to the selection committee, who came to a "unanimous decision," Asymptote is "the place where translators want to publish their own and their authors' work."
Asymptote’s Editor-in-Chief, Lee Yew Leong, said, "It is extremely special for our magazine to be honored among the many wonderful international initiatives celebrated at this year's London Book Fair Awards, especially given that our international setup means we don't qualify for national funding. This award truly belongs to all editors, contributors, and guest artists past and present, who have made Asymptote what it is today: a site to discover the best in world literature.”
This is the first time that a Singaporean organisation has been nominated for, as well as won, an award at the London Book Fair.
Asymptote is delighted to be officially recognized for its work in the field of literary translation over the past few years, and wishes to first and foremost thank all its supporters and collaborators from around the world who have made it possible for Asymptote to consistently publish such stunning work. Our team of volunteer editors, translators, designers, and other creatives is thrilled to be sharing this award, and we are already hard at work on our exciting next issue, out this coming July!
- See more at: http://www.asymptotejournal.com/lbf2015award.php#sthash.3QhDQqdt.dpuf
LONDON, UK: We are very proud to announce that Asymptote was today presented with the London Book Fair’s 2015 International Literary Translation Initiative Award. The prize is part of the International Excellence Awards, designed to showcase publishing innovation around the word, held in partnership with the UK Publishers Association.
The award is presented to the organisation that the committee considers to have “succeeded in raising the profile of literature in translation, promoting literary translators, and encouraging new translators and translated works,” whose scope of achievement lies outside of the UK. Last year’s winner was the Best Translated Book Award, launched by Three Percent, the University of Rochester’s ground-breaking prize for literature in translation.
Shortlisted alongside the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Paper Republic (China), Asymptote’s recognition this year reinforces its status as an innovative audio-visual platform showcasing the most exciting writing from around the world.
According to the selection committee, who came to a "unanimous decision," Asymptote is "the place where translators want to publish their own and their authors' work."
Asymptote’s Editor-in-Chief, Lee Yew Leong, said, "It is extremely special for our magazine to be honored among the many wonderful international initiatives celebrated at this year's London Book Fair Awards, especially given that our international setup means we don't qualify for national funding. This award truly belongs to all editors, contributors, and guest artists past and present, who have made Asymptote what it is today: a site to discover the best in world literature.”
This is the first time that a Singaporean organisation has been nominated for, as well as won, an award at the London Book Fair.
Asymptote is delighted to be officially recognized for its work in the field of literary translation over the past few years, and wishes to first and foremost thank all its supporters and collaborators from around the world who have made it possible for Asymptote to consistently publish such stunning work. Our team of volunteer editors, translators, designers, and other creatives is thrilled to be sharing this award, and we are already hard at work on our exciting next issue, out this coming July!
- See more at: http://www.asymptotejournal.com/lbf2015award.php#sthash.3QhDQqdt.dpuf

Mar 20, 2015

STEAUA -- Album de Familie -- 29 de scriitori inclusiv MARGENTO


Foto (c) Octavian Bour


Trei jucării pentru toată lumea

Trei jucării preferate cu care mă joc eu – și nu numai eu – de vreo douăzeci de ani, deci cam de la prima tinerețe/a doua copilărie, sunt: internetul, cartea și studioul.

De fapt e o copilărie comună – internetul era încă la pubertate în 90 și–, cartea (lucrată pe calculator pentru tipografie) abia se năștea (cu năbădăi!), iar studioul – de înregistrări sau de pictură – încă se minuna că ar putea exista în varianta independentă și occidentală, începând, de fapt, mai întâi ca „parazit” al vechilor case de cultură (studențești) sau instituții (radio, tv etc.) dar (și) cu „scule” occidentale. Treptat dar sigur, printre acestea din urmă și-au făcut loc calculatoarele specializate și programele de prelucrare a sunetului și montaj al înregistrărilor.

Se vede „din avion” ce leagă toate aceste jucării, cel puțin ca mediu(m): calculatorul și programele sale informatice, jucăria actuală universală. Dar nu despre asta vreau să vorbesc aici în principal.
Să le iau pe rând. Cum se știe, azi nimeni nu există dacă nu e pe google și, cine știe, poate curând se va putea spune la fel și despre facebook (în tot cazul, nimeni nu mai zice asta despre televizor). Și ca scriitor sau artist, lumea te caută, te (re)descoperă, te citește sau ascultă în primul rând pe internet, și chiar dacă te știe, tot acolo caută confirmarea, sau cel puțin amănuntele; sau noutățile. Și reciproc, pentru mulți (toți?), principalul public spectator și țintă, ca și principalul mediu de transmitere (conștient sau nu), principala „tribună”, așadar, este internetul.

Mi-amintesc că acum cîțiva ani, la o lectură de poezie pe care am făcut-o împreună cu Jerome Rothenberg și Ilya Kaminsky (cum, nu știți cine sunt?! Păi dați repede o căutare pe... google) la o librărie importantă (Barnes & Noble) din San Diego au venit vreo... 15-20 de oameni (deși s-ar putea să nu mă pot abține să exagerez – în plus, bineînțeles) care au cumpărat două cărți (dintre care una a mea, luată, cred, din curiozitate, sau mai degrabă din greșeală). Vă sună cumva cunoscut cifrele astea? Dar... pe internet... și Jerry și Ilya sunt niște star-uri, blogul lui Jerry are sute, uneori mii de vizite pe zi, iar cărțile lui sunt best-seller-uri. Pe piața de poezie, să fim bine înțeleși; pe care se comandă în proporție zdrobitoare on-line.

A doua jucărie – cartea. Cine nu s-a jucat cu font-uri, formate, diverse forme de paragrafe, spații etc., în varianta electronică a manuscrisului unei cărți? Cu atât mai mult dacă era vorba de o carte cu (inclusiv) poezie concretă, sau care să conțină și imagini. Știu din proprie experiență că la un moment dat joaca respectivă ajunge să eclipseze scopul final. De fapt nu este cumva cartea ca produs finit un compromis față de valențele proteice ale manuscrisului electronic? Teologul nostru literat zicea, tocmai, că a tipări cartea e ca o întoarcere din exil sau de pe o mare furtunoasă, când „așa și tipografulu de-a cărții sfârșire/ laudă neîncetată dă și mulțămire”. Dar el deși avea bun cumpăt, n-avea computer, în timp ce nouă ne place să ne pierdem cumpătul la computer. Ca să nu mai zic că trăim în era exilului generalizat, cea transnațională. Alt tipograf, însă, se bucura dinainte s-apară random access memory (celebrii biți de RAM) să celebreze aleatoriul și impuritățile ce interveneau pe placa de tipar, luându-le drept emblemă a propriei opere. Cine? – Walt Whitman, desigur, căci titlul Leaves of Grass poate fi citit, a spus-o bine Harold Bloom, și așa.

De altfel, cum zice C.T. Funkhouser, dintre noile direcții în poezia digitală, una esențială este cea în care se creează/asamblează/programează „poems of the Web, by the Web, for the Web” – poeme de pe net, generate prin net, pentru net. Chiar și cartea pe hârtie a ajuns să implice cel puțin una dintre aceste trăsături. Atâta timp cât nu exploatăm complet oportunitățile astea ne comportăm ca un Gutenberg care și-ar fi folosit invenția doar tipărind planuri și schițe de urmat în cărțile pe care ar fi urmat apoi să le scrie tot niște copiști, tot ca înainte: de mână, pe piele de vițel.

A treia jucărie – studioul. Aici voi înșirui doar ce a însemnat și înseamnă studioul (de înregistrări, căci despre atelierul de pictură am mai vorbit) pentru (mine ca membru al trupei) MARGENTO. Libertatea și frenezia de a forma, deforma și reforma împreună (prin [non-]con-[per]formare reciprocă) sunete; și odată cu ele, mii de alte lucruri.

O experiență ce nu poate fi înlocuită de nimic altceva – cum zicea Kenneth Koch, dacă te-au prins cincizeci de ani fără să te fi bucurat de ceea ce înseamnă sexul oral, e târziu pentru tine. Sau Fellini: de foarte tânăr am vrut să mă fac regizor să pot pune toate femeile alea frumoase să facă toate chestiile alea [în film]. Și noi la fel, pe înregistrare: oral – prin și cu tot felul de instrumente și mașinării.

Societate inițiatică și agenție de propagandă. Carnaval; suntem cine vrem noi și oricine vrem noi e (cu) noi. Măscări. Zaiafet. Templu; in-templ-are; întâmplare. Bibliotecă; potecă. Piață – de bârfe și zvonuri; talcioc și iarmaroc. Belșug; ioc! Cioc-cioc, bate și te vei deschide. Ex... amen! Restaurant, cramă; ramă. Ail – cocktail. A-mes(s)-tec(h) – best track. Te(ch)st. Dormi-t(h)or. Exhibiționism, voyeurism, seducție și mas(s)-turbare și (prin) rendez-vous; rendez-voodoo. Orga(sm[s]). Budă. Ghe(e)nă. (E-)scatologie. Topos al farsei. Asceză cu supradoză. Navigări, asamblări. Telepatie, telechinezie, chinezărie. Munci și nopți. Concentrare, percuție, prostituție, inducție. Vacanță la separ-eu absurd. Academie beată. Clinică. Moarte clinică. Bala-moog. Pro-(me)nadă. Café de Flore. Confesional. Confusional. Confisional. Hău.


Sunt 3 jucării? Dar la ce bun sau rău o carte sau un net (de poeme) care să nu aibă și ele tot ce-am zis că e la studio?
                                                                                                                                           --MARGENTO
(text aparut in Steaua, no 1-2/2015)

Feb 18, 2015

Lou, Inkpen & MARGENTO Computational Poetry Paper Accepted to FLAIRS Conference


The paper “Multilabel Subject-based Classifi cation of Poetry” by Andr es Lou, Diana Inkpen, and Chris T an asescu (MARGENTO) has been accepted to the 28th Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society–FLAIRS–Conference; the paper is part of the ampler MARGENTO project Poetry Computational Graphs and the Graph Poem.
Here is the abstract:
Multilabel Subject-based Classi cation of Poetry
by Andr es Lou, Diana Inkpen, and Chris T an asescu (MARGENTO)
University of Ottawa, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Abstract
Oftentimes, the question “what is this poem about?” has no trivial answer, regardless of length, style, author, or context in which the poem is found. We propose a simple system of multilabel classifi cation of poems based on their subjects following the categories and subcategories as laid out by the Poetry Foundation. We make use of a model that combines the methodologies of tf-idf and Latent Dirichlet Allocation for feature extraction, and a Support Vector Machine model for the classi fication task. We determine how likely it is for our models to correctly classify each poem they read into one or more main categories and subcategories. Our contribution is, thus, a new method to automatically classify poetry given a set and various subsets of categories.

Feb 3, 2015

ASYMPTOTE Note on NAUM & FOARTA


[A slightly shorter version of this note first appeared on Asymptote's blog HERE)

“Eutychia” has been identified by Simona Popescu—poet, critic, and foremost authority on Romanian poet Gellu Naum’s (1915 – 2001) work and life—as the Naumian poem par excellence, not in the sense that all the rest of his huge oeuvre is contained in it, but as being one of the most comprehensive and emblematic expressions of the poet’s creed and poetics.  And particularly of the unmistakable way in which for such a poet poetry was not only an art, but a mode of existence. 

A visionary, a great shaman—le grand chaman de Roumanie, as a French critic once called him—whose poems have always worked as Pythic oracles, Naum was also an incredibly shrewd and inclusive craftsman; the very personable and humorously playful person that he was in everyday life was the same as the artist who integrated biographical details, political critique, and popular culture (along with his erudite and alchemically-oneiric intertexts) into his mesmerizing rhythms, expansive diction, and enthralling imagery.  Although—or rather particularly because—he was a true  poeta vates, a poet-prophet, he did not look down on the ‘trivialities’ of ‘common’ existence, while his corrosive ironies never settled upon postmodern detachment, and therefore, instead of rendering the verse flat, his absorption of the ‘insignificant’ actually turned the everyday into something magical, miraculous, and overwhelming.

The psychedelic experience of watching an insect and its colors at the closest range possible, for instance, triggers a sort of meta-rational ‘derangement of the sense[s]’ that helps one to see and hear a poetry of the species and, at the same time, an ecopoetry avant la lettre:

so the psychedelic colored insect
waits for me
with its shape reminiscent of triangular bombardments
the insect-poet looking at me with its deep blue-green eye
struck dumb on an unripe raspberry
the sole survivor of a long extinct species
the newly arrived insect-poet set to witness crazy
death by tragic multiplication
as I am certain it recognizes me
as far back

as when the times got tangled
I sit on a rock and look forward
through tangled times
as a psychedelic age arrives while the rest is merely
a golden blue-green ethereal triangular insect
trying to communicate words

In fact the title of the poem itself, which could be translated as “true luck” or “good fortune” (from Old Greek) speaks of a search for, or conjuring of good omens, of what brings good luck and a good fate, the poem thus assuming the functions of an amulet or a spell.  Yet this is not solely about one’s personal fate, as the root of the word, Týche (Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was in ancient times the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny.  This city, one starts to suspect while plunging into Naum’s ocean of images, is one of the whole world (humans, nature, and cosmos together), and contemplating its destiny is having a vision of—to paraphrase Eliot—its end in its beginning; and both its beginning and end are fractally present in our insect-tiny “daily events”: “Only when beginning at the end are we able to understand/ the nostalgic mechanics of daily events the fury of layers preceding and/ following us…”

The surprising relevance of such a poet nowadays (famous in Romania and widely known in France and Germany but until recently virtually unknown to the English-speaking world) is most likely one of the reasons why his recent selected poems in (facing page) translation, Athanor & Other Pohems from Calypso Editions, was unsurprisingly named by World Literature Today one of 2013’s most notable translations.

*
One of the Romanian poets I would love to see featured in Asymptote in a near future is Șerban Foarță.  Foarță is one of the greatest writers in postwar Romania who, because of his subtle, euphonic, and pervasive formalism has hardly been, if ever, translated into English (or any other language, for that matter). 

A versatile and tirelessly prolific practitioner of forms ranging from the ‘classic’ and troubadour traditions to rock lyrics to experimental chiasmic “holograms,” the poet has over decades authored an oeuvre of such pitch, variety, and amplitude that one could indeed—as younger poet Emilian Galaicu-Păun allegedly (jocosely but relevantly) did before meeting the writer in the flesh—suspect that behind his name hides an entire institute of philology and poetics. 

A masterful and acclaimed translator in his own right, with an overwhelmingly diverse and demanding list of accomplishments—from the French Renaissance poets to Leonard Cohen’s Book of Desire to Mallarmé and Apollinaire to Georgio Baffo’s ErosonnetsFoarță himself represents a huge challenge to the most courageous translator.  Well… except when he includes the translation in the text itself, as in this multilingual poem I can quote without having to translate anything but the (actually already a thousand-time translated Villon’s ballad) title—BALADA DOAMNELOR DE ALTĂDATĂ (“Ballad of the Ladies of Bygone Times”)… Still, even the simplest things are not that simple: how could one ever render the subtitle, with its pun on Babylon and François Villon’s name—“în vavil(l)onică transcripţie”—“In Babylonian/Vavil(l)onian Transcription”?…  Until we find an answer, here is one stanza and the envoi of this brilliant poem:

Where is the wise girl Heloïs
Because whose abelardiana
Calamitas à Saint Denis
Incepit (Domine, hossana!);
E dov’è ora la sovrana
Die nun befahl daß Buridan
Verschlungen sein soll, a Sequana;
A gde prekrasnîi snej d’antan?
Sweet Prince, I don’t say omnia vana;
mais quant, enfin, à l’antean-
nua nix, ~ frag, bitte, die Morgana:
« Où sont, où sont les neiges d’antan? »



—MARGENTO


Dec 1, 2014

EXPERIMENT-O New Issue


Issue 7--to the frivolous interlopers (HERE!!!)
Featuring Elizabeth Bertoldi, Volodymyr Bilyk, Selina Boan, Craig Calhoun, Ariel Gonzalez Losada, MARGENTO, a rawlings & Sachiko Murakami, sven staelens, Carol Stetser, Tom Walmsley and Liz Worth.

Oct 21, 2014

ASYMPTOTE New Issue--Fall 2014


Now with MARGENTO as Editor-at-Large
Welcome to our mythology edition! Catch our video trailer here. From the "kiss of death" Danish textbook representative Erik Langkjær shared with Flannery O'Connor—in an exclusive account sixty years after the fact—to the "synthetic saint" in Tedi López Mills' experimental poetry and the "divine fairy tale" in Shi Tiesheng's memoir of disability, modern myth permeates this issue, knocking elbows with characters from old-world mythology.

You'll find an aging Minotaur transplanted to Amsterdam's red-light district, Hamlet's Norse ancestor reincarnated in operatic form, and biblical vine-growers at a corporate event schmoozing up to their ultimate shareholder, God. What's more, many of this issue's writers and poets are themselves legendary figures: Mohammed Said Abdulla and Ch'oe In-ho blazed a trail for fiction in Tanzania and South Korea respectively, whereas Ukraine's Serhiy Zhadan and Bengal's Joy Goswami belong to that rare breed: poet superstars.

In our annual English poetry feature, poets take up myth, not simply as lie or cultural truth, but as the literary process by which certain narratives and images become naturalized, privileged, contested, and abandoned: Mary Jo Bang dramatizes a mythologization of the self in an atmosphere of surveillance; Michael Farrell recontextualizes Australian icons into what might be "socially involved and meaningful / role(s)"; and Zhou Sivan employs Greek, Chinese, and Catalan myths to question nationhood and reproductive love. Among our translated poets, the Japanese futurist Hirato Renkichi studies the "line between the past and present and future, in ecstasy;" Euphrase Kezilahabi's poet-figure enters "this forest / full of a century's darkness," emerging as the modern Swahili writer he is today; while Galician writer María do Cebreiro depicts a fragmented lover's discourse.

A central motif in myth, transformation recurs in many of this issue's stories (as well as in Brazilian artist Odires Mlászho's "Altered Books"). In "News of a Girl Lost at Sea," an ignorant peasant woman is transformed into a saint for muttering the same nonsensical line every night (because, it turns out, "God doesn't care about the quality of the prayers themselves, just about the will behind them"). In J. Rodolfo Wilcock's "Aram Kugiungian," transformation—and an extreme case of identity crisis—occur when our twenty-three-year-old protagonist suddenly realizes "he was also someone else or, indeed, several others." In the excerpt from Ch'oe's Another Man's Story, set in a mysterious café, an ex-brother-in-law suddenly reappears before the protagonist—as a woman. More familial drama—with exes and in-laws—unfolds over a game of Monopoly in Ulrike Syha's tightly drawn "Do Not Pass Go." With vivid colors and expressive strokes, Monika Grubizna, our talented guest artist, captures these and our new issue's many other moments of Sturm und Drang.

With our fourth anniversary just around the corner, we're pleased to unveil a slew of events—in addition to our stops in Beijing on October 20 and in Hong Kong on November 6, appearances in fifteen more cities worldwide are being planned for our celebrations between January and April 2015. (Keep your eye on our Events page or follow us on Facebook and Twitter for breaking Asymptote news!) For our special feature in April 2015, we will be traveling fifty years back in time to explore the Vietnam War and its legacy. As you check out this feature's submission guidelines, don't forget that we also welcome submissions for our blog, which recently celebrated its first anniversary with the launch of a "New in Translation" column, reviewing the latest titles each month.

Finally, if you're excited by all that we've done and will do to stimulate the transmission of world literature, we want you to know that there are ways in which you can help. Consider a donation (we're newly tax-deductible in the US!) or a video endorsement for our upcoming Indiegogo campaign. Or just spread the word by downloading our high-resolution Fall issue flyer and getting it displayed at your local independent bookstore/school/café. After all, myths—and the best literary projects—continue only as long as people keep sharing them.
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